Darrell Bourque

NameOAuthor










© John Jarman Slaughter

Biography

Darrell Bourque is a former Louisiana poet laureate, the recipient of the 2014 Louisiana Writer Award, and the 2019 Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities Humanist of the Year Award. Among his poetry collections are In Ordinary Light: New and Selected Poems and Megan’s Guitar and Other Poems from Acadie. His 2019 works, From the Other Side: Henriette Delille and migraré,are both sets of ekphrastic poems keyed to the paintings of Shreveport artist Bill Gingles.

 

 

 


Schedule

9 a.m. to 9:45 a.m.
State Capitol Building, House Committee Room 4
Book Talk
Ernest J. Gaines: Conversations

10 a.m. to 10:45 a.m.
Barnes & Noble Bookselling Tent
Book Signing

1:15 p.m. to 2 p.m.
Capitol Park Event Center, Meeting Room
Reading
Louisiana Poets II

2:15 p.m. to 3:15 p.m.
Capitol Park Event Center, Meeting Room
Reading
I Hear Louisiana Singing: A Walt Whitman 200th Birthday Celebration
This program made possible in part by funding from the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities.

3:30 p.m. to 4:15 p.m.
Barnes & Noble Bookselling Tent
Book Signing


NameOAuthor

migraré

migraré begins with the foreign, the "Other," a title in a "foreign language," language we used to call any language we did not speak. Today we might call that language a modern language not a foreign one. I wanted to confront the reader with the idea of "to move into" as the poems are entered into, and to thereby suggest the literal meaning of the word migraré in Italian, derived from Latin. I wanted to explore how divisive and fearsome the unknown is, to explore what it might mean to have to create a new identity for ourselves as we continually "move into" new spheres of being, to explore how decentering it might be to have to redraw maps, to move boundaries, to redefine home. I wanted the poems to suggest that the complexities of transformation affect not only what is moved into but also who is moving, the agency of moving and what is moved from. I wanted to begin with something as seemingly simple as rudimentary quantum physics and transfer the knowledge derived from that base study to nationalism, identity, individualism and community. Each of the poems is ekphrastic, each poem a meditation and a keying to an abstract expressionistic painting by Bill Gingles. Ekphrasis more often than not relies on realistic or imagistic art as the springboard for the poem that emerges from it. I wanted the erasure or near erasure of the usual and the expected to be at work in the creation of these meditative poems. I wanted the reader to feel the distance between the visuals of the painting and the nonlinear narratives created inside the poems.


NameOAuthor

From the Other Side: Henriette Delille

Former Louisiana Poet Laureate Darrell Bourque examines the life of Henriette Delille, a creole gens de coleur in New Orleans who dedicated her life to helping the elderly and poor. Poems are inspired by and accompanied by the paintings of Louisiana artist Bill Gingles.

 

 


NameOAuthor

Ernest J. Gaines: Conversations

As the acclaimed author of The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman and A Lesson Before Dying, Ernest J. Gaines (b. 1933) has been publishing stories and novels for more than sixty years. His brilliant portrayals of race, community, and culture in rural south Louisiana have made him one of the most respected and beloved living American writers.

Ernest J. Gaines: Conversations brings together the author’s own thoughts and words in interviews that range from 1994 to 2017, discussing his life, his work, and his literary legacy. The interviews cover all of Gaines’s works, including his two latest books, Mozart and Leadbelly: Stories and Essays (2005) and The Tragedy of Brady Sims (2017). The book provides a retrospective of his work from the viewpoint of a senior writer, now eighty-five years old, and gives an important international perspective on Gaines and his work.

Among the many things Gaines discusses in his interviews are the recurrent themes in his works: the search for manhood, the importance of personal responsibility and standing with dignity, the problems of fathers and sons, and the challenges of race and racism in America. He examines his fictional world and his strong sense of place, his role as teacher and mentor, the importance of strong women in his life, and the influence of spirituality, religion, and music on his work. He also talks about storytelling, the nature of narrative, writing as a journey, and how he sees himself as a storyteller.

Volunteer

Book-loving volunteers are essential to the Louisiana Book Festival's success. Whether it's escorting authors, guiding visitors, selling refreshments, working with children in the Young Readers Pavilion or other fun and rewarding assignments, the Louisiana Book Festival wants you to join the volunteer team.

Read More

Twitter
  •  

Follow on Twitter

We are social
Quick Email