Programs by Genre - History

10 a.m. to 10:45 a.m.
State Capitol Building, House Committee Room 2
New Orleans and the World: 1718-2018 Tricentennial Anthology

Contributors Richard Campanella, Robert L. Dupont, Freddi Williams Evans, Kara Tucina Olidge, and editor Nancy Dixon explore New Orleans’ first three centuries through the eyes of its finest historians.

10 a.m. to 10:45 a.m.
State Capitol Building, House Committee Room 4
Feldpost: The War Letters of Friedrich Reiner Neimann, a German Soldier on the Eastern Front
Denis Havel and Whitney Stewart

10 a.m. to 11 a.m.
State Capitol Building, House Committee Room 5
Guidebooks to Sin: The Blue Books of Storyville, New Orleans

Though many scholars have written about Storyville, no thorough contemporary study of the blue books—directories of the neighborhood’s prostitutes, featuring advertisements for liquor, brothels, and venereal disease cures—has been available until now. Pamela D. Arceneaux’s examination of these rare guides invites readers into a version of Storyville created by its own entrepreneurs.

10 a.m. to 10:45 a.m.
State Capitol Building, House Committee Room 6
Images of America: South Baton Rouge

Founded in 1699, Baton Rouge was the site of countless historic events and the home to many people, including those of African ancestry. Authors Raymond A. Jetson and Lori Latrice Martin study the African American community located in South Baton Rouge.

10 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.
State Capitol Building, Senate Committee Room E
Scopena: A Memoir of Home

Charles E. “Buddy” Roemer III gives readers his personal reflections on the influential people and events that taught him life lessons as he grew up on his family’s cotton plantation in Bossier Parish, Louisiana.

10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.
Capitol Park Museum, First Floor Auditorium
City of Remembering: A History of Genealogy in New Orleans

In exploring one particular community of family historians in New Orleans, Susan Tucker reveals how genealogists elevate a sort of subterranean foundation of the city–sepia photographs of the Vieux Carré, sturdy pages of birth registrations from St. Louis Cathedral, small scraps of the earliest French Superior Council records, elegant and weighty leaves of papers used by notaries, and ledgers from the judicial deliberations of the Illustrious Spanish Cabildo.

11 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.
State Capitol Building, House Committee Room 3
Spiritualism in Nineteenth-Century New Orleans: The Life and Times of Henry Louis Rey

Melissa Daggett with David Johnson, moderator

11:15 a.m. to Noon
Capitol Park Museum, First Floor Auditorium
Mardi Gras: From Carnival Balls to Courir de Mardi Gras

Jennifer Atkins, New Orleans Carnival Balls: The Secret Side of Mardi Gras, 1870-1920
Brian J. Costello, Carnival in Louisiana: Celebrating Mardi Gras from the French Quarter to the Red River

11:15 a.m. to 11:45 a.m.
Capitol Park Museum, Third Floor Exhibit Hall
Stepdaughters of History: Southern Women and the American Civil War

In Stepdaughters of History, noted scholar Catherine Clinton reflects on the roles of women as historical actors within the field of Civil War studies and examines the ways in which historians have redefined female wartime participation.

Noon to 12:45 p.m.
State Capitol Building, House Committee Room 6
That Was Then: Memories of Cane River

Cane River—also known as Isle Brevelle—is reputedly the oldest American settlement founded by and for people of color. That Was Then, Memories of Cane River is documentation through Joseph Moran’s photographs of the historic settlement.

Noon to 12:45 p.m.
State Capitol Building, Senate Committee Room C
Past as Prelude: Racial Conflict and Violence

Patricia Michelle Boyett, Right to Revolt: The Crusade for Racial Justice in Mississippi’s Central Piney Woods
John DeSantis, The Thibodaux Massacre: Racial Violence and the 1887 Sugar Cane Labor Strike

12:15 p.m. to 1:15 p.m.
State Capitol Building, House Committee Room 4
New Orleans: The First 300 Years

This is the quintessential book on New Orleans for every New Orleanian, history buff, or visitor wanting to know more about who we are and how we got to this place called New Orleans.  Editor Errol Laborde leads the discussion with contributors Sally Asher, Brobson Lutz, John R. Kemp, and Peter Ricchiuti.

12:15 p.m. to 12:45 p.m.
Capitol Park Museum, First Floor Auditorium
The Incomparable Magazine Street

John Magill traces the history and culture of the road that curves between stately St. Charles Avenue and the Mississippi river and speaks to not only how Magazine fits into the urban growth of the Crescent City, but it also highlights what it has become: an enchanting combination of both elegance and the down-to-earth.

Noon to 12:30 p.m.
Capitol Park Museum, Third Floor Exhibit Hall
The Red River Campaign and Its Toll: 69 Bloody Days in Louisiana, March-May 1864
Henry O. Robertson

12:45 p.m. to 1:15 p.m.
Capitol Park Museum, Third Floor Exhibit Hall
General Fox Conner: Pershing’s Chief of Operations and Eisenhower’s Mentor
Steven Rabalais

1 p.m. to 1:45 p.m.
State Capitol Building, House Committee Room 6
Cityscapes of New Orleans

Exploring the Crescent City from the ground up, Richard Campanella, a historical geographer and professor at Tulane University, takes us on a winding journey toward explaining the city’s distinct urbanism and eccentricities.

1 p.m. to 1:45 p.m.
Capitol Park Museum, First Floor Auditorium
Tending to the Dead: Louisiana Cemeteries

Peter B. Dedek, Cemeteries of New Orleans
Mary H. Manhein and Jessica H. Schexnayder, Fragile Grounds: Louisiana’s Endangered Cemeteries

1:15 p.m. to 1:45 p.m.
State Library, First Floor Seminar Center
Come Sunday: A Young Reader’s History of Congo Square
(Ages 8 to 12)

Freddi Williams Evans’s image-driven book develops a deeper understanding of the people and events that shaped the history of New Orleans’s Congo Square. This book supports standards and benchmarks in social studies and language arts, and it invites discussions, cross curriculum instruction, and extended learning opportunities.

1:30 p.m. to 2 p.m.
Capitol Park Museum, Third Floor Exhibit Hall
Sioux Code Talkers of World War II
(Ages 8 to 12)

Told by Andrea M. Page the great-niece of John Bear King, who served in the First Cavalry as a Sioux Code Talker, this informative title explores not only the importance of the indigenous peoples to the war but also their culture and values.

2 p.m. to 2:45 p.m.
State Capitol Building, House Committee Room 6
Images of Depression-Era Louisiana: The FSA Photographs of Ben Shahn, Russell Lee, and Marion Post Wolcott
Maria Hebert-Leiter

2:15 p.m. to 2:45 p.m.
Capitol Park Museum, Third Floor Exhibit Hall
The General’s Niece: The Little-Known de Gaulle Who Fought to Free Occupied France
Paige Bowers

3 p.m. to 4 p.m.
State Capitol Building, House Committee Room 6
Places in the Past Tense: Missing Old Louisiana

Anne Butler, Bayou Sara: Used to Be
Adley Cormier, Lost Lake Charles

3:30 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Capitol Park Museum, First Floor Meeting Room
The Amazing Crawfish Boat

John Laudun’s chronicles the development of an amphibious boat that transformed the Louisiana prairies into a powerhouse of aquaculture alongside agriculture.

Volunteer

Book-loving volunteers are essential to the Louisiana Book Festival's success. Whether it's escorting authors, guiding visitors, selling refreshments, working with children in the Young Readers Pavilion or other fun and rewarding assignments, the Louisiana Book Festival wants you to join the volunteer team.

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